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Certification Watch (Vol. 22, No. 32)

In this week's roundup of the latest IT certification news, six savvy students have been crowned for their mastery of Microsoft Office, TestOut revamps its Microsoft Office skills training, and more.

Microsoft Office Specialist World Champions Crowned in Big Apple

 

The results are in from what is probably the biggest IT certification-centric competition in the world. On Monday, testing and certification provider Certiport announced the winners of the 18th annual Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) World Championship competition. Students between the ages of 13 and 22 compete each year to demonstrate their certification-reinforced mastery of key progams from the world's most popular workplace productivity software suite. This year, more than 850,000 students from 119 different countries participated, with first-, second-, and third-place winners for the two most recent versions of Word, PowerPoint, and Excel eventually emerging from a global scrum. Students from the United States claimed three prizes, as did students from the Chinese special administrative district of Macau (a Portuguese colony from 1557 until 1999).

 

2019 MOS World Champions in New York City

2019 Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) World Champions (Courtesy of Certiport)

 

Winners in each of the MOS World Championship categories are as follows:

 

Microsoft Word 2013

1st Place: Li-Ting Wang (Taiwan)
2nd Place: Pak Ming Yip (Hong Kong)
3rd Place: Hoi Chon Tam (Macau)

 

Microsoft Word 2016

1st Place: Adrian Boier (Romania)
2nd Place: Pou Leng Ho (Macau)
3rd Place: Aryan Trehan (India)

 

Microsoft PowerPoint 2013

1st Place: Kyriakos Chatziefthymiadis (Greece)
2nd Place: Ana Marija Atanasovska (Republic of North Macedonia)
3rd Place: Ashlyn Dumaw (USA)

 

Microsoft PowerPoint 2016

1st Place: Seth Maddox (USA)
2nd Place: Ondrej Cach (Czech Republic)
3rd Place: Adrian Muntean (Romania)

 

Microsoft Excel 2013

1st Place: Chi Kin Che (Macau)
2nd Place: Fariz Firdausi (USA)
3rd Place: Anh Tran Hoang (Vietnam)

 

Microsoft Excel 2016

1st Place: Mihaela Florea (Romania)
2nd Place: Kitithat Khemsom (Thailand)
3rd Place: Tarik Džambić (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

 

ISACA Blogger Has Tips for First-Time Cybersecurity Job Seekers

 

What does it take to get your first job in the worker-hungry cybersecurity realm? The competition for new cybersecurity professionals is fierce, with an anticipated shortfall in the field of 3.5 million workers by 2021. That doesn't mean that you can just walk into any available job, however, as attested by guest blogger Charlotte Osborne in a recent post to the ISACA Now Blog of cybersecurity and governance association ISACA. Osborne, a cybersecurity recruiter by trade, lays out a fairly thorough seven-step process to help rookies get their first job in the field. Her first recommendation is to start at the very beginning, so to speak: Ask yourself what kind of job role you are seeking. Osborne said that many young cybersecurity job seekers are passionate about their skills and knowledge, and eager to enter the workforce, but haven't really thought much about what they'd like to do. You'll both narrow your search and impress hiring managers, she writes, if you begin with a clear idea of the role you want to fill. We're especially inclined toward her third step, which is to consider becoming certified. There are plenty of credentials out there, and adding one or two of them to your résumé could strongly influence a potential hiring decision.

 

And with All of Thy Git-ing, Git Understanding

 

There's a strong interest among employers in tech workers who are fluent with Git and GitHub. Surveys of tech job posting sites frequently reveal that employers want incoming software employees to know their Git. For some, that probably raises the question of what, exactly, Git and GitHub are. An article from the most recent issue of Certification Magazine explores that topic in depth, tracing the roots of Git (and GitHub), and laying out what hiring managers are looking for when they express an interest in those areas of IT expertise.