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Certification Watch (Vol. 22, No. 34)

In this week's roundup of the latest IT certification news, a Cisco blogger drops some intent-based networking (IBN) knowledge, Certification Magazine spotlights four teenage girls with cybersecurity skills, and more.

Prepare to Embrace Intent-Based Networking

 

IBN could be the future of computer networking.The learned comsological philosopher Blue Oyster Cult once counseled that mere mortals should not "fear the reaper." There's an echo of that calming wisdom in a brand new post to the VIP Perspectives blog at Cisco Learning Network, the Cisco certification and training hub. A guest blogger and enterprise networking consultant from Sweden advises that fellow networking professionals should prepare for the advent of so-called "intent-based" networking (IBN). IBN popped onto the long-range IT radar as a promising guiding concept for the future of networking last year. The basic idea is to make networks more fluid and responsive by using software to plan, design, and implement needed network adaptations on the fly. The VIP Perspectives post is impressively thorough, with links to additional resources throughout. Cisco just recently announced plans for an all-new DevNet certification track. It may not be much longer before IBN-driven certification emerges as well.

 

CompTIA: The Three Ps of Certification Can Boost Your IT Career

 

Among all of the many Ps and Qs that life (along with generations of anxious mothers and fathers) expects you to mind are apparently the "three Ps" of IT certification. Blogger Matthew Stern outlined this new P-powered paradigm in a recent post to the IT Career News blog of tech industry association CompTIA. As Stern sees it, certification offers three key benefits to IT professionals, each of which can be flagged by a particular P-word. The profound puissance conferred by improved "performance," enhanced "professional influence," and increased "promotion potential" (a doubly potent P-pairing) can, it would seem, power up your career outcomes. In terms of performance alone, Stern reports that recently compiled statistics demonstrate that certified professionals can bring as much as 52 percent more "core domain knowledge" to the IT workplace than their non-certified peers. That knowledge boost, Stern says, likely accounts for certified professionals being 10 percent more likely than non-certified peers to be comfortable with their IT responsibilities. If you want another reason (or three) to feel good about getting certified, than Stern's post will provide some of the pluck and playfulness that may have been missing from your IT soul.

 

Let the Help Desk Help You

 

What a difference a generation makes. Help desk guys — people who know how to make computers do what they're supposed to do — used to have the status of minor deity among less knowledgeable coworkers. These days, help desk work is largely seen as baptism by fire that incoming IT professionals must briefly endure before moving on to bigger and better IT responsibilities. You can see that perception reflected in a trio of posts last week to the online blog of tech training provider CBT Nuggets. Taken together, the three posts provide some sage advice about growing through an important phase of the typical IT employment arc, but the attitude revealed in the titles of each post confirms that the prevailing view of help desk labor is decidedly less than favorable:

 

How Long Should You Stay on the Help Desk?
5 Certifications to Get You Off the Help Desk
How to Stop Worrying and Love the Help Desk

 

If working in IT support has got you down, then you'll find some excellent advice from all three posts.